Hyping “Deep Mirror Proof Like”

Proxibid DMPL Really Silver Melt


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In the past some of the most popular posts have dealt with Morgan Silver Dollar deep mirrors and numismatic photography. The reason for their popularity may be that far too many of us have made mistakes based on overzealous lot descriptions and/or poor digital imagery. Click to expand image above and read how this Proxibid lot was described.

The ability to discern a deep mirror prooflike coin (DMPL) that will grade at NGC or PCGS is difficult enough when inspecting the coin in person at a show or shop, for instance. A Morgan Dollar has a chance to be DMPL reflecting text 6 inches away from the source.

Factor this, too: When you’re buying online, crisp expandable photos are a necessity. You also must deal with a reputable seller who knows how to grade. But the worst combination involves poor photography and overzealous sellers who, alas, do not know how to grade mint state and condition meriting DMPL.

Recently Proxiblog purchased a coin online from a previously trusted seller. Even though the photography was poor, we had good dealings with this house in the past, so we bid to win.

The description on the poorly photographed 1921 Morgan Dollar was described as deep mirror, with reflectivity from 6+ inches away, MS64-65, “a gorgeous coin” full of mint luster and cartwheels.

This is the coin we received, photographed properly.

1921nodmpl-506x500

It is harshly cleaned, ruined, and silver melt. Not DMPL.

For the rest of this article, click here.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.

What’s with DMPL photos on Proxibid?

We have become so annoyed at awful photos of proof-like deep mirror coins on Proxibid that we threw a few coins on a table, took out a smart phone, and captured DMPLs far better than several houses.

Here are Proxibid photos of DMPLs (click photo to expand):

Here are smartphone photos:

The latter shows a true DMPL, able to catch a mirror reflection 8 inches away from object. If you’re not capturing DMPLs, you’re doing your consignors a disservice. As for bidders, don’t place a maximum unless you see the mirror.

Please show the mirrors of Morgans and the cameos of Franklins. See this article for more information.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.

Cameos and Mirrors

Only a few Proxibid auctioneers have the numismatic skill to correctly identify a “DMPL” (deep mirror) Morgan dollar. We discussed that previously in this post. A DMPL, however, is easier to determine than ultra cameo on a Franklin half. The article below explains how to do both … and accurately describe your choice and pricey lots.

Do you know your Cameos from Mirrors?

Cameos have to do with proofs, and Mirrors with mint state. Cameos are an especially important condition with Franklin Half Dollars, and mirrors with Morgan dollars. So let’s use those denominations as examples and acquaint ourselves with how the top grading companies distinguish their various designations–Cameo Proof, Deep/Ultra Cameo Proof and Deep Mirror Prooflike.

Of the two sets of designations, Prooflike and Deep Mirror rely less on numismatic experience and subjectivity. That’s because both conditions can be tested according to set standards.

For the rest of the article, click here.