Boos & Booyahs

When items warrant, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions in this light-hearted feature. We name the best, but you will have to search for the bad. (Note: Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions.)


June 30, 2011




June 30, 2011

Booyah! To Gary Ryther Auctioneers for listing the authentication identifier for rare fractional gold, one of the riskiest purchases a collector can make on Proxibid because of all the $5 fakes, tokens and souvenirs being sold as genuine in various auctions.


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who doesn’t know the importance of mint marks, in the case of this 1882-CC Morgan–listed erroneously as 1882. The difference in price is $100. Proxibid numismatic sharks will target this auctioneer whenever he sells coins!


Booyah! to Silvertowne Auctions, not only for identifying a pricey coin as containing a “lamination,” but also defining what that numismatic terms means (“extra metal”).

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July 24, 2011

Booyah! To Meares Auctions for being proud of its 10% buyer’s fee and showcasing that in its email blasts! Meares keeps on improving customer service and consignments. Kudos atop booyahs!


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who not only posts blurred, impossible pictures but also lists a 1966 clad Quarter Dollar as “40% silver.” Why sell online if you cannot provide the visuals, let along accurate lot descriptions?


Booyah! To Capitol Auctions for a detailed historical description of “CONSTANTINE THE GREAT” ancient coin. It takes time to write accurate lot descriptions, especially on coins, but they lure the high-rollers and Capitol knows that, explaining its top-caliber consignments.


Booyah! to Silvertowne Auctions for identifying rim damage on a coin whose picture does not readily show that. Silvertowne tops our list of best online auction houses because of its expert numismatist who writes the best lot descriptions on Proxibid!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that thinks a $4 mint set is “an investment” and wants 15% buyer’s fee plus $19.95 shipping to send it!


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who used the same picture for several Carson City dollars without noting that a stock photo was being used (or the same in-house photo for each GSA Moorgan). Why do auctioneers take shortcuts with photos when contracting with an online portal like Proxibid?!


Booyah! To Big Fellows Auction in its first Proxibid auction for accurate lot descriptions, including this one noting the tube of silver eagles were pristine out of a monster box (when some eagles of dubious condition are often just stored in such a tube).


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that took a picture of a US Mint box without also photographing the coins inside, not only on this but on eight similar lots, which confuses us, as there is gold inside … unless wanting to give the onsite audience an edge because they have access to the coins on display. We don’t like to think that, even though none of the sets containing gold sold to Proxibidders. That’s just probably an outcome of an auction house taking shortcuts with digital photography. There are no visual shortcuts in online coin selling. That’s a good lesson with which to end this post!


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August 10, 2011

We continue to see auctions with high opening bids pass item after item. In one case, only about 40 out of 460 coins sold. We wrote about this in an earlier post, “High Reserves Bring Low Hammers,” noting that Proxibid only gets a small fee when an item sells but gets nothing at all when a lot passes. This trend of setting high opening bids not only undermines the auction experience but also, in our independent view, qualifies as an abuse of the Proxibid system.

Without naming the auction companies, here are three photos from three houses whose auctions had an extraordinarily high volume of passed coins–in one instance, setting a high reserve and then inexplicably passing on the item:

. The house set high opening bids on slabbed coins, as in this case of an 1888-O Morgan variety, only to pass on items, an issue that Proxibid might look into as it undermines the auction experience.


This auction advertised “LOW” starting bids. They were high, as passed items attest, usually about 13% under retail when buyer’s fee and shipping were added. This coin has a retail value of $165. Assuming the opening bid won the item, the price plus shipping comes out to about $158. Better to advertise these as “wholesale” rather than “LOW” opening bids. Better to have no reserves at all. (Footnote: In a new auction, this house did not post opening bids at all–booyah!)


Opening bids in this auction were so high that only about 40 of 450 lots sold. That seems unreasonable when 18% buyer’s fee is added, plus shipping. Thankfully, Proxibidders are not patronizing these auctions to the extent that they are no-reserve sessions where bidding wars often underwrite the occasional bargain.<.



How fine to see a gloved hand holding a Morgan dollar correctly. You’ll see auctioneers holding coins to the camera in several Proxibid auctions. This is the first to show how to handle coins correctly, holding a Morgan dollar by the rim. Booyah to Matthew Bullock Auctioneers.


Another booyah to Bullock Auctioneers for correctly identifying artificial color! Every week in online auctions doctored coins such as this taint the auction block. If you need to bone up on artificial color, click here.


This house doesn’t complete the lot description sufficiently and provides too small a picture to make out the coin. If you’re selling on Proxibid, you need to master the basics for the online audience so that they can see and identify what they are buying!


Booyah to Silver Trades auction for this nicely depicted and described lot. Silver Trades takes great care in describing the numismatic components of each coin. The house also publishes several photos of the same lot so that bidders can view the coins from different angles.


We’ve written before about “Sticker Shock“–obscuring vital parts of a coin with lot number stickers and the like. Boo! In this case, the auctioneer hides the arrow feathers of an 1879-S Morgan, which could have the parallel feathers of the 1878 reverse, elevating the coin’s worth substantially.


Booyah to Jewelry Exchange for correctly identifying a stock photo, notifying buyers that the photo is “representational” of the lot and does not portray the actual item for sale.

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August 25, 2011

One Big Booyah! to Weaver Signature Coin and Currency Auction for lowering the buyer’s fee to 5% for top-quality gold, knowing this spurs competition and higher bids with the online vs. onsite folks. (Otherwise, given the price of gold, online bidders will lose out to onsite customers every time.)


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who needs a new camera or lessons in how to focus one!


Boo! to another auction house that not only refuses to show the reverse of coins but also gets the mint mark wrong–twice!–in the lot description.


Boo! to another auction house that cannot tell the difference between Type I and Type II gold dollars. How come they always mistake the inexpensive Type I for the pricey Type II?


Boo! To yet another auction house that labels Type I gold dollars Type II. (Click picture to expand and see the difference.) Also, this auctioneer inflates the estimated price by $650-$1000. Please learn basic numismatics if you solicit coin consignments! You’ll get return customers … and booyahs on this page!


Booyah! To Express Auctioneers not only for identifying a copy of a US Mint commemorative but also for noting it as not silver. This shows honesty and integrity. We applaud!


Boo! to this auction house trying to sell a coin variety without showing the reverse (where the variety can be verified). Yet another auction house taking photographic shortcuts and yet warning online bidders that they are responsible for inspecting coins before placing bids. Geez. Let’s hope Proxibid requires photographs of both sides of a coin, soon. Anything else takes advantage of online coin bidders.


Booyah! To Fisher’s Auction Service for stating that the seller thinks the coin is uncirculated, but it just might be cleaned. That’s how you win trust!


Booyah! To Munda Auctions for accurate lot descriptions and good photos of obverse and reverse. Nice work.


Booyah! To Silvertowne Auctions for noting hard to see rim bumps on these Morgans. Silvertowne’s lot descriptions rank among the best!


Boo! To this unnamed auction house that keeps using the same stock photo for Carson City dollars without stating that it is the same photo, a shortcut that should be banned, because buyers cannot see what they are buying. For the life of us, we just cannot understand why some auctioneers think taking photos of coins to be sold on the Internet is such a hassle!


Booyah! To Key Date Coin Auctions for noting that this Morgan dollar may have been cleaned. It’s a judgment call, but Key Date did the right thing in saying so. That reflects well on the auctioneer.


Booyah! To Affliated Auctions for the best lot descriptions and fine photography of the week! Notice all the pictures of the various items in this lot, plus the detailed and accurate descriptions of coins, sets and more, with accurate estimates to guide bidding. Wow!

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September 8, 2011

Booyah Bailey Auction! Always good to mention cracked holders, even when the picture doesn’t necessarily show the crack. Nice.


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer selling high dollar coins with low dollar visuals!


Boo! to an auction house that knows coins, shows only the box of a GSA Carson City dollar, when the condition of that dollar is key in making a bid.


Booyah! to top-house Weaver Coin Auction for correctly noting a coin has been dipped when the picture may indicate that it hasn’t. This spells integrity so that buyers can bid with confidence.


Boo! To yet another auction house that cannot focus a camera and that shoots with no lighting.


Boo! To an unnamed auctioneer with a retail opening bid and 17% buyer’s fee on top of that, assuming no one else bids for the coin. Yes, this is a lovely coin that can bring a premium, and if that’s the case for the high opening bid, then simply state that in the lot description. Proxibid gets no payment when lots fail to sell.


Boo! To another higher than retail opening bid. We’ve inserted NGC retail price on this one so viewers can verify why we keep harping on this complaint. And we’ll keep noting that Proxibid gets no payment when lots fail to sell.


Boo! To an unnamed auctioneer who confuses the high relief Peace dollar with the low-dollar Morgan one, inflating the estimated value by hundreds of dollars.


Booyah! To Key Date Coins, one of the most improved auction houses on Proxibid, showing other auctioneers how to depict a GSA dollar. Way to go!


Boo! and Booyah! To this unnamed auction house that notes scratches on the reverse (THANK YOU!) but doesn’t also show the reverse (SIGH).


Booyah! To Osage Auction for noting a restrike rather than original coin. This showcases honesty and scores points as well as bids with Proxibloggers.


Booyah! To Affiliated Auction for good pictures and even better lot descriptions.


Booyah! To Silver Trades for making an exceptionally difficult numismatic call on a coin that may be prooflike or proof. Auctioneer is a noted numismatist.


Boo! To an unnamed auction house depicting a coin with poor photography, charging retail and then adding 18% buyer’s fee.


Booyah! To Key Date Coins, once again, for sharper than ever photography and now variety designation.

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October 11, 2011

Booyah Key Date Coins! for noting alteration on a Morgan dollar, evidence of doctoring disclosed to bidders before rather than after the sale.


Booyah! to Jewelry Exchange for noting a cleaned coin with lesser value than one in natural state. More auctioneers should do this!


Booyah! to Kaufman Auction also for noting cleaning. We’re seeing more of this on Proxibid, and we’re cheering you on!


Booyah! again to Scott Hall for yet another example. Cleaning is difficult to capture with a digital camera. That’s why these descriptions are so valuable to bidders.


Booyah! to Christy’s Auction for noting the reserve–helps bidding!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that gets everything wrong, from imprecise lot description to only one side of a coin to a picture of, well, an orb rather than a coin!


Boo! to an unnamed auction house that provides only picture of an obverse, especially irksome with 1890-CC because bidders cannot see if it contains a pricey tailbar on the reverse. If you don’t know what that means, then provide the picture of the reverse so that those who know can bid accordingly.


Boo! to an auction house that calls a common and worn 1943 half “rare.” This one is not rare, worth about silver melt.


Booyah! to Jewelry Exchange for providing a neat numismatic note. It’s a joy to learn about coins when bidding, and this auctioneer knows his coins!


Booyah! to Tiffey’s Auction House for noting that this coin is a fake. It’s illegal to sell fake coins as authentic. Some coin clubs and organizations collect fake coins to help identify others.


Booyah! to Weaver Coin and Currency Auction for stimulating competition by lowering the buyer’s fee on gold. This house is not afraid to set trends on Proxibid! The more competition, the greater the profit in auctioneering, and the Weavers know that.


Booyah! to our top house Kreuger and Kreuger for taking time to create uniform lot descriptions that utilize Proxibid’s bidder window to the max. In its October auction, this house managed to secure higher than retail bids on more than a third of his coins. Good lot descriptions and photos spur competition.



October 30, 2011

Booyah Black and Gold Auction! for noting rim dings that many auctioneers overlook when selling coins but that affect the grade.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that states that an 1911-D quarter eagle is the key to the series but inappropriately leaves out the reverse picture of the coin, knowing there are “strong” and “weak” “D”s worth hundreds of dollars’ difference in price. Actually, only the “strong” D is key to the series; but would you place a high bid in the thousands without seeing the reverse? Would you pay $5,000 for seeing only half of a used car? (You get the picture–NOT.) This house specializes in coins, too. Sigh.


Booyah! to Hradil Auction for noting that a coin is a copy. It’s important to state that even if the word “copy” is on a flip or visible on the coin itself. You never want to be accused of selling copies without identifying coins as such.


Booyah! to Hi Dollar Auction for noting that this set lacks the original envelope–a fact that few auctioneers would bother to state but that one which affects value. Nice job.


Booyah! to Munda Auction for providing good photos and stating that this coin has been polished. Again, it’s important to note that in the lot description even if the word is on the flip.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that quotes the PCGS price list for a coin holdered by a lower-tier entity. You have a PowerBall’s chance of getting $3300 for this coin. And why the estimated value of $300? This coin will most probably grade MS68 or MS69, with the latter worth $38.


Booyah Leonard Auction! for calling a bottom-tier company’s grade for what it is–polished and buffed. This is how you do it without citing PCGS’s price list for this coin.


Booyah! to Scott Auction for noting scratches that might not be visible on the coin from the provided picture. Yet another lot description that helps the reputation of the auctioneer.


Booyah! to Silvertowne Auctions for noting cleaning and other defects on coins. Larry Fuller’s reputation as a grader is one of the reasons bidders look to Silvertowne for lot descriptions.


Booyah! to Weaver’s Auction, our top house, not only because of the great consignments but also because of the lot descriptions that note coin doctoring. Thank you, Dave and Cheryl Weaver!


November 13, 2011

Booyah Arneson Auction! for noting defects that online photography may not capture in a coin. Arneson is in the process of becoming more competitive with upgraded photos and complete lot descriptions, as well as lower buyer’s fees. Click here to read more about the house.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for not showing the certification on the slab, important for authentication.


Booyah! to Gaston and Sheehan Auctioneers for noting artificial color, one of the most common types of coin doctoring.


Booyah! to Silvertowne Auctions and Larry Fuller, numismatist, for identifying buffing and advising bidders what the coin might be worth rather than what the coin appears to be worth. Nice job.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that photographs without flash on a dark background with a dark-toned coin. If you want to sell online, master basic photography! This is a terrible combination of worst photography practices.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that doesn’t note a harshly cleaned rarer silver dollar, in a condition that approaches silver melt or, at best, a hole filler in an album. It’s a rare coin; what’s rarer is to see a rare coin destroyed.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that photographs the album but not the coins. For Pete’s sake, we’re selling the coins, Mr. Auctioneer!


Booyah! to Chaparral Auction for noting that the US Mint Package is missing the gold dollar. It may seem obvious from the picture, but to protect yourself as an auctioneer, always note what is not in the box as well as what is in it.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that commits one of the worst numismatic sins in describing a slabbed coin from a bottom-tier company as being worth $1650. The coin is so hideous as to be worth only $45. Never quote Redbook prices unless for a top-tier company like NGC or PCGS.


Booyah! to Weaver’s Auction, our top house, for noting coins that have damage that online photography cannot easily capture. Doing so helps the integrity of the house.



Booyah! to Capitol Coin Auctions for noting more coin doctoring in consignments selling on Proxibid. Numismatic expertise is important if you sell coins regularly and want returning customers.



Booyah! to Silver Trades for its continuing expert numismatic lot descriptions, which are a joy to read. You can read about this auctioneer by clicking here.



November 30, 2011

Booyah Capitol Auction! for noting coin doctoring, one of the few houses that take the trouble to point out these alternations. We appreciate your numismatic skill and integrity.


Booyah Jewelry Exchange! for noting cleaning on a 2-cent coin that looks uncirculated. Without this notation, the winning bidder would have been disappointed. We appreciate your honesty and numismatic skill, too!


Booyah Weaver Auction! Talk about numismatic skill, honesty and integrity? Take a look at this by Weaver Auctions. It’s a zinc core cent that appears to be a mint error (but cannot guarantee that it is, as the auction house notes). For the record, I think the plating was removed in a high school chemistry experiment. One of our sons showed us how to do it. Can’t guarantee that’s what happened here, but can guarantee that Weaver Coin and Currency Auction is one of the best on the portal.


Booyah Silver Trades! for yet another accurate description, excellent photography and numismatic information. It’s fun to visit Corey’s auctions because his lot descriptions and audio are as good as any coin show … except you can win lots by tuning into his!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that doesn’t provide a reverse picture of a three-legged buffalo nickel. There are many fakes out there. Typically one looks at the reverse not only for the three legs but also for a small planchet lump near, ahem, the lower hind quarters. Can’t do that here. So advise not to bid.


Boo? Booyah? we just couldn’t make up our minds for one of the classic lot errors in memory. We posted it because we couldn’t resist. And it nearly went viral (oops–can’t say that without a Freudian slip) on coin sites. Once again, ahem, we just couldn’t resist. The word is UNCIRCULATED!


December 16, 2011

Booyah Silvertowne Auction! for noting light damage to the reverse of a coin, which the photo doesn’t pick up.


Booyah Leonard Auction! for noting artificial color, one of the commonest coin doctoring gimmicks in numismatics. Other auctioneers seldom mention this because it does take some skill to detect. Click here for a tutorial!


Booyah Key Date Coins! Auctioneer here knows his coins … and knows when to mention a consignor stating the grade a bit overzealously (as the flip documents). Noting a consignor-graded coin is a good practice, especially when the auctioneer questions the seller’s description of a coin. Way to go!


Booyah Western Auction! for yet another accurate description, this time pointing out a rim ding that is not immediately noticeable in the picture. Helps the reputation of the house!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that doesn’t provide pictures of key date coins in what looks to be a premier set of Lincoln wheat cents. Too bad for the consignor!


Booyah Hall’s Auction Company not only for noting a crack in the holder but taking the time and trouble to show the flaw to bidders. Once again, this builds integrity. Nice work!


Key Date Coins gets a second Booyah! for noting that bank rolls may have been opened. Of course no one can tell what happened to these rolls, but we know sellers who can unwrap and rewrap original bank rolls, taking out the better coins. Always good to inspect these and add a disclaimer, as the auctioneer does here.


Boo! to this new Proxibid auction house that doesn’t provide pictures of reverse of coins. Often that is where the mint mark is, especially on Morgans, whose reverse varieties can bring extra $$$.


Booyah Kaufman Auction! for noting cleaning, one of the most difficult conditions to depict in photography. Here the auction house helps by noting evidence of cleaning on the obverse.


Booyah Weaver Auction! again for noting cleaning, this time in a box of coins that often lure hobbyists because Morgan dollars tend to tone in them. Dave Weaver puts up a red flag, and we thank him.


Leonard Auction gets a second Booyah! for noting that these California fractional gold pieces are replicas. He also shows the reverse. If the reverse has a bear on it, it’s a replica. Bid accordingly (like $5 instead of $300).




January 17, 2012

Booyah Silvertowne Auction! for noting rim dings and the advisory to bid accordingly. We appreciate your numismatic skill and integrity.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for mistaking a brass souvenir token for California fractional gold. Beware of bears. Some are gold (about $10-15 dollars worth) but most often are plated. If you see a bear and not a denomination, you can bet your token is a trinket.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that doesn’t note scratches on the coin but that are plainly visible when the photo is expanded.


Boo! to this unnamed but knowledgeable auctioneer who only shows the box of a GSA 1880-CC dollar, which has multiple varieties. This house has great consignments but continues to take occasional shortcuts on photos. Nothing is more important than good photos of obverse and reverse if you hope to get ever higher bids on Internet.


Booyah Kaufman Auctioneering! for noting cleaning, one of those flaws that often digital photography cannot capture. By noting cleaning, you ensure proper bids and avoid hassles of complaint afterward.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that hypes a consignor’s MS64 as gem-plus (MS66). We see too much of this. Check out this article to learn what is and what is not a “gem” coin.


Booyah Jewelry Exchange! for noting several flaws in this coin that are not readily apparent in the photograph, once again establishing trust that brings return coin buyers to a particular house’s auctions on Proxibid.


Booyah Midwest Coins! for lowering the buyer’s fee on gold, the best way to stimulate competition and make a strong sale.


Booyah Shamrock Auction Service! for noting damage to a coin, the kind again that might be overlooked in the typical digital photograph, establishing standards for this house and ensuring return customers.


A very small Boo! to this unnamed auction house that makes a typo in the description of a gold coin. Typos can cost, especially when you mistake a gold coin for a copper cent!


Booyah Weaver Coin Auction! not only for noting the cleaning of coins but also their VAM designations. (VAMs are varieties that bring premiums. For more information, see the Vam World’s site


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



February 19, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

Booyah Silver Trades Auction! for a linked video to a charming scene of a young numismatist selling her collection. This shows real technological savvy, and the little girl sold her collection, to boot! Wonderful use of Proxibid technology.


Booyah Bid-A-Lot Auction! for noting polished coins, which turn up frequently on Proxibid and which always need to be described because this is a form of coin altering. Moreover, some unethical consignors target auction houses for all their polished coins, especially when the auctioneer states “I AM NOT A COIN EXPERT.”


Booyah! Kaufman Auction for describing this coin as cleaned, even though the cleaning isn’t readily apparent from the photos. Shows auctioneer knows coins and respects bidders!


Boo! to this unnamed but knowledgeable auctioneer who doesn’t take the time to note that these are replicas recently banned from eBay. Perhaps he thinks anyone purchasing them should know that as these if real would cost a fortune. With stakes so low, just mention these are copies, OK?


Boo! to this otherwise fine auction house that claims in the description that an outlaw owned this coin. In this case, do not show us the money; show us the certificate of authenticity that an outlaw really owned the piece. Otherwise, keep mum.


Booyah! to Key Date Coins whose auctioneer Eddie Caven knows his VAMS and numismatic errors. Eddie calls ’em as he sees ’em–literally. Moreover, he keeps on improving with each auction. His pictures are great, and he ships inexpensively and quickly.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that claims it doesn’t know coins and then only shows one side of the coin as if bidders are to make a determination on this basis alone. For all we know, this could be a Carson City dollar, but we would have to see the reverse to make that call.


Booyah Silvertowne Auction! for describing the damage to this coin in addition to advising bidders what top dollar would be if they still desired the lot. This is yet another reason why so many bidders trust Larry Fuller’s descriptions. Good work!


Booyah Rick’s Relics! for using a stock photo of coins and being sure to emphasize that in the lot description, a practice accepted in numismatics as long as the mention of “stock” photo and description of condition are accurate, and we believe these to be.


Booyah Weaver Coin Auction! for noting that the coin is altered (whizzed) and then providing a large format photograph so that bidders can see for themselves. As this is a key date coin, bidders were sure to place high offers for this coin. This mitigates disappointment later and is yet another indication of why this house as been in our top three best companies most of last year and overall winner for best house in our awards.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



March 11, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

Booyah Scott Auction! for noting the rim ding and its position. These flaws are enough to keep an otherwise good-looking coin from being graded by top houses PCGS, ICG, ANACS and NGC. The flaws aren’t always apparent in photos, so auctioneer’s reputation is enhanced by noting them in the lot description.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that takes a photo so dark as to make extremely difficult any type of online evaluation. If you’re going to sell on Proxibid, get your photography in order … or get off the portal because you’ll be losing money for your consignors (and yourself).


Baloney! Deep Mirror? One unnamed auction house labeled more than a dozen uncirculated coins “deep mirror,” probably because that designation sells coins or because the auctioneer doesn’t know numismatics. For a coin to be deep mirror, it has to reflect 6 or more inches a 12-14-point piece of type so that the words are readable. Few, if any, of these coins qualified in the auction.


Booyah Brian’s Auction Service! for noting a probable grade (I think it’s too generous) on coins in this holder, all too prevalent on Proxibid. What’s worse, we’ve seen auctioneers cite PCGS values for coins that should sell with a slight premium over silver melt.


Booyah Brian’s Auction Service! once again for noting cleaning of this particular coin, although the photo shows little evidence of cleaning, again enhancing the auctioneer’s numismatic honesty.


Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting the correct designation of California gold, which often is just a dipped brass replica with a bear on the reverse, hyped by unknowing auctioneers to be genuine gold of a very desirable series … but one also fraught with fakes. This is a credit to Dave Weaver for taking the additional time to identify the item, another indication why Weaver’s is maintaining its top Proxiblog ranking.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that seems to miss the fact that “genuine” on PCGS labels means ungradeable but authentic (not fake). This is a clear example of chemical treatment. To learn about artificial toning–altering of coins–click here.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for noting that a coin is slabbed but withholding information about the particular slabbing company. If you say a coin is slabbed, show the picture AND the certification number. As we have seen on Proxibid all too often, self-slabbed overhyped coins are usually worth only a small premium over melt.


Booyah Gary Ryther Auctioneers! for identifying an illegally altered key date coin and explaining how it was done so hobbyists and bidders can learn how to spot them. Some bidders collect doctored coins so that they can identify the various methods of fraudulent alteration.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for believing this is an expensive coin rather than a Morgan retaining a little cartwheel effect after being lightly circulated and dinged. On the other hand, you can sense that this auctioneer is smitten with Morgan dollars. Wait until he sees a real “deep mirror” coin!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house hyping as “deep mirror” an ordinary coin and then getting the designation wrong. You can’t have an extra-fine coin that reflects 6-8 inches a strip of 12-14-point type. Let’s please stop identifying coins as deep mirror. They are truly rare. That’s why they command high prices … and why few auction houses ever see them.


Booyah Key Date Coins! for noting that a coin has been dipped, difficult to detect in digital photos because the surface of the coin contains small grains and dull finish and usually has to be identified via a loop with good lighting.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



April 4, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

Booyah Topless Collectible Coins! for noting that this counterfeit coin is a copy without the required markings as required by the Hobby Protection Act. To test for base metal, often used in fakes (and probably used in this poor copy), test with a magnet. Silver isn’t magnetic.


Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting scratching and cleaning of a rarer Carson City coin whose flaws are typically obscured when placed in a plastic holder. Hard to get those moves by auctioneer Dave Weaver whose lot descriptions are among the best on the portal.


Boo! Deep Mirror? No way! This unnamed auction house continues to label common cartwheel Morgans as “deep mirror.” For a coin to be deep mirror, it has to reflect accurately 6 or more inches. This won’t even qualify as proof-like. To learn how to test for mirrors, read this article.


Booyah Engstrom Auction! for noting that these Morgan dollars are polished. Some auctioneers unfamiliar with coins would have labeled these “shiny” or even “deep mirror” when they actually only are damaged because of amateur attempts at cleaning.


Booyah Key Date Coins! for noting that the consignor may think this is a DMPL, but auctioneer and numismatist Eddie Caven just doesn’t see it. (Neither do we.) When auctioneers write accurate lot descriptions, as Caven does, accompanied by excellent photographs that capture the true condition of a coin, buyers can bid with confidence. That helps consignors more than allowing their inflated grades.


Booyah Kaufman Auction! for noting cleaning on this Mercury dime. Digital photography often does not pick up cleaning on small coins like dimes. That’s why we need the auctioneer to inspect the coin and depict it as accurately as possible. It’s yet another method to insure return bidders and, in the end, helps consignors once again because buyers trust the house.


One Big Booyah! to Larry Fuller of Silvertowne Auctions, one of the top graders on the portal, who warns bidders that this expensive coin has a slight bend. That decreases the bids by hundreds of dollars. But it increases the chances that buyers will return to this auction because they can trust the lot descriptions.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


April 29, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah! to Weaver Auction, not only for identifying a US coin minted on a foreign planchet but also describing why the coin might not be grade-worthy. Pretty sophisticated numismatic stuff going on here.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for listing an 1881-S as 1881 both in the description and in the title. On the other hand, boo to NGC for its silly designation of “S” for both “Silver” and “San Francisco” mint. (PCGS uses $1 rather than “S.”)

Booyah Nevada Public Auction! for noting that these are copies rather than bullion gold. As we reported previously, due to eBay’s policy on copies, many of these so-called coins would flood the Proxibid market. Be sure to note copy or replica when you see one … and consider not selling it if it lacks “copy” on the surface of the item. Anything else may be a violation of the Hobby Protection Act.


Booyah Kaufman Auction! for noting that this coin has a scratch, which often are too faint to see even on the best digital photography. By identifying flaws in a coin, you earn bidder trust.


Booyah Western Auction! for noting scratches. We encourage every consignor to inspect coins for any flaws, the most common of which are cleaning, artificial coloring, scratches, plugs, whizzing, tooling and environmental damage.


Booyah Key Date Coins! for noting that the consignor graded this coin and, perhaps in doing so, left a fingerprint on the surface. Fingerprints detract from a coin’s worth, but again, digital photography sometimes may not pick that up, so we have to rely on the auctioneer.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that does not provide pictures of the reverse of a coin. We’ve seen this shortcut before, even by some of our favorite auction houses. So we have to call these shortcuts as we see them and hope that the house provides the reverse before auction time.


Booyah Brian’s Auction! for noting that this seemingly rare coin actually only is a plated replica, probably brass, and not worth listing (in our view). True, some folks collect counterfeits but others try to pass them off as real.


One Big Booyah! to Silvertowne Auction for noting that the holder has been cracked and seemingly opened. Sometimes fraudulent sellers slip in a lower grade or problem coin with the same date and mint mark. Silvertowne calls our attention to that.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house listing an 1853 $1 gold as Type II. That rarer type begins in 1854, so this couldn’t be Type II, which features a different Indian princess and planchet size.


Booyah Fox Valley Coins! for noting that a scarce Liberty dollar has been plugged and repaired, a difficult flaw to detect at times and one that an auctioneer needs to share in the lot description.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



May 21, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah to GWS Auctions for noting that this coin is fine 20 and appears to have been dipped, basically making this silver melt, as the 1885-O in this condition has no real numismatic value. We know some Proxibid coin auctions that would have called this deep-mirror prooflike and taken bidders for a numismatic ride. GWS knows coins and does a good job with descriptions.


One Big Booyah to Leonard Auction whose auctioneer John Leonard routinely assigns appropriate grades to hyped bottom-tier slabbers. We’re seeing this awful slabs increasingly on the portal because eBay’s quality control restricts them by not allowing sellers to refer to grades.


Booyah Weaver Auction! for lumping bottom-tier slabbed coins into one low-tier lot without bothering to photograph the inflated grades of each coin … or actually try to persuade bidders that the grades are legit, as some unscrupulous or numismatically ignorant Proxibid auctioneers do.


Boo! Deep Mirror? DMPL? This is flipping ridiculous! This unnamed auction house routinely believes or promotes the ridiculously hyped grades on flips of his consignors. This is basically silver melt. We continue to see Proxibid auctioneers unethically calling ordinary coins deep mirror prooflike (DMPL). For a coin to be deep mirror, it has to reflect type accurately 6 or more inches. To learn how to test for mirrors, read this article.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for showing pictures of a box rather than the coin … after stating that the coin has golden highlights. We’re selling coins, not boxes. When will Proxibid coin auctioneers understand that photography is everything for the online buyer? Houses that invest in photography get higher bids. If you’re going to sell online, treat that audience with the same courtesies as your onsite bidders.


Booyah Key Date Coins! for noting that the capitol holder states 1951 but 1954 coins are inserted in the holder, a small but important notation in the description and one that shows auctioneer Eddie Caven cares about accuracy in his regular coin auctions.


Booyah Munda Auction! for noting possible light cleaning on this coin. Digital photography often does not pick up cleaning, especially when it is only suspected (usually a dipping rather than a scouring). That’s why we need the auctioneer to inspect the coin and depict it as accurately as possible. It’s yet another method to insure return bidders and, in the end, helps consignors once again because buyers trust the house.


One Big Booyah! to Larry Fuller of Silvertowne Auctions, one of the top graders on the portal, who knows how to list and grade raw California gold coins, one of the most counterfeited coins on the Proxibid portal. We recommend all auctioneers invest in CoinFacts to identify California gold. Quick way to identify authenticity: There should be no bear on the back of the coin where a denomination will be displayed 1/4, 1/2, 1 “dollar.” The word <bigdollar is critical. Bears were a means to sell replicas without being charged as counterfeiters by the federal government.


Booyah Leonard Auction! for the second time in a week for clearly identifying fake California gold as replicas. These typically are made of brass, have a bear on the reverse, and are worth no more than a few dollars whereas real California gold can be worth hundreds if not thousands of dollars. John Leonard, like Larry Fuller of Silvertowne, takes time to write accurate lot descriptions so that buyers can bid with confidence.


Booyah Star Coin and Currency! for noting solder on the reverse of this otherwise desirable gold coin. Without such notice, which is also in the title as well as the lot description, a bidder is apt to hurriedly place a maximum price and then complain later upon receiving the coin about the solder on the reverse. Better to deal with this upfront. Honesty as always is the best policy on Proxibid!



June 18, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

> One Big Booyah to GWS Auctions for noting that the slab of this coin may have been tampered with. We know unscrupulous persons routinely open, extract and replace coins without breaking holders and even re-glue so that evidence is concealed. But it is not always easy to tell. Sometimes people try to crack open coins for resubmission and decide against that halfway through the process. Brigitte Kruse alerts the bidding audience that the slab has damage, advising to bid accordingly.


One Big Booyah to BidAlot Coin Auction for noting that this coin is holdered by a bottom-tier slabber, also advising to bid accordingly. We have seen some auctioneers quote MS66 and higher Red Book retail prices for basic silver melt coins.


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who hypes one of the bottom-tier slabs, claiming that the common 1900-O Morgans is rare and that this may be a good deal when the buyer is close to being cheated in our estimation. Don’t pretend to know coins when you do this.


Booyah! to Larry Fuller at Silvertowne Auctions for not only exposing the bottom-tier slab but also for giving a truer grade. These hyped slabs give the hobby a bad name; Larry makes it all better.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for hyping what looks like a $50 Morgan as super-rare and perhaps worth the ridiculous price of $6000 on the flip. We wish Proxibid would create a badge for laughable lot descriptions. But this really isn’t a laughing matter, especially if a bidder is a novice and falls for this untrustworthy hype.


Boo! to this auctioneer who showcases a 1922 No D cent whose reverse has three types–two cheap, one rare. When are auction houses on Proxibid ever going to learn that we need photos of obverse and reverse?


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for failing to show the reverse of purported California gold, without which we cannot discern genuine from replica with a price difference in the hundreds!


Boo! YET AGAIN to another unnamed auction house for failing to show the reverse of purported California gold. It may be gold, and that just might make it a counterfeit, which violates the Proxibid user agreement. For more information about California gold, click here.


One Big Booyah! to Scott Strosnider at Scott Auctions for noting a coin might be buffed and therefore damaged and not worth a high bid. Scott’s known for integrity. This is just one example.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.

Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



July 3, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah to Key Date Coins for noting small but nonetheless signs of damage on an otherwise beautiful coin. As you’ll see in the example below, some auctioneers are not noting obvious damage like scratches and graffiti and even citing values based on Red Book prices for coins that are essentially silver melt or have low numismatic worth. Eddie is more concerned about his integrity as a numismatist than in selling a lot and risking an unsatisfied customer. Our hats are off to him and Key Date Coins.


Boo! to this unnamed auctioneer who fails to note scratches and graffiti and has the temerity to state this severely damaged coin is almost uncirculated 55, a few points from mint state. To the contrary: This coin is a few steps from the silver melting pot and is, at best, a filler in a coin album.


Booyah! to Star Coin and Currency for noting damage to a gold $2 1/2 dollar coin caused by one time being part of a jewelry piece. This type of damage can be obvious or subtle, and is always a problem if a bidder wants to authenticate and slab such a coin with a top grading company. Star Coin’s transparency is appreciated.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for failing to provide reverse photos, especially of an 1890-CC, which just might be a coveted tailbar variety. We have stopped bidding in auctions that only show one side of a coin and urge our bidders to do the same. Badge or no badge, this auction house needs a tutorial in selling coins.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for calling a coin “cameo” when the holder clearly states that it is NOT and the price difference is significant ($60+). Moreover, cameo coins require frosted devices on both sides (and this half-dollar lacks that). Let’s not hype coins; let’s really not hype coins holdered by NGC or PCGS as their values are pretty apparent and their graders do not miss much.



Boo! Speaking of PCGS, do not use its price guide for coins that are not holdered by this top-company, even if showing an NGC coin (PCGS’s closest rival). PCGS has distinct grading standards and its values are based on that. No doubt this is a lovely coin, but citing $1000 is out of line as similar ICG coins (ANACS top rival) have sold for $50 or less. To ascertain current values, we recommend subscribing to PCGS Coin Facts which lists sale prices for PCGS, NGC, ANACS and ICG. (We never bid without checking CoinFacts for current pricing levels.)


One Big Booyah! to McKee Coins for noting this roll of steel cents is reprocessed, or replated, distinguishing its worth from uncirculated rolls of such cents which can sell as high as $100. This is worth less than $20 and of value only to give to youth numismatists to spark their interest in the hobby, showing children a plated and real World War II-era steel cent so that they can tell the difference.


One Big Booyah! to Black and Gold Auctions for noting scratches and cleaning of an otherwise rare key date Indian head cent, coveted by collectors in extra fine to uncirculated condition. This is example is accurately graded as VG, or very good, with damage noted in the lot description. We know some houses that would have called this extra fine and omitted details about poor condition.


One Big Booyah! to Capitol Coin Auction for noting a rare double die on this 1909 VDB cent, even going so far as to reference the page in the popular varieties book (Cherrypicker’s Guide) to alert bidders of the inherent value of this particular lot. Would that all Proxibid auctioneers took this much time in their lot descriptions!


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



July 17, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah to Capitol Coin Auction for this comprehensive lot description about an encased collection of Morgan dollars. Others might have just left the description at that, but Capitol evaluates each coin and gives a best-guess estimate so that bidders gain knowledge before placing their maximums. Moreover, the auctioneer accompanies that comprehensive lot description with sharp, expandable photos. We can ask for nothing more!


Booyah! to GWS Auctions for jam-packing this lot description with mintage, value, variety and condition. We’ve noticed other auction houses beginning to do the same as an indicator of numismatic integrity. We’re happy to see it!


Booyah! to Liberty Shops for catching a tell-tale mark of a counterfeit coin, even one that the forger made using silver. Some might not put such a coin on the market, but some hobbyists and coin clubs purchase counterfeits as educational tools to help identify fraudulent coins put up for auction or sale.


Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting that this coin has been whizzed, or tooled, even though the flip only says “cleaned”–with a question mark. We have no question that this coin has been whizzed, and we complement Dave Weaver for identifying it in the lot description. (Larger photo used here so that viewers can see the tell-tale smoothing on Lady Liberty’s cheek.)


Booyah Auction Orange! for identifying a scratch on this rare 1914-D cent, a key date. The scratch was small and might have been missed by a bidder. By calling attention to it, the auctioneer is ensuring that the buyer should have few complaints. That’s why lot descriptions are so important.


Booyah Key Date Coins! for challenging the information on the flip and reporting that the coin, a key date 1949-D Franklin half, is NOT almost uncirculated but has been cleaned. This is why Eddie Caven continues to be among the most conscientious on Proxibid. We applaud his numismatic integrity!


Boo! to this auctioneer for calling a brass replica a California gold token. Yes, there are gold tokens, made as souvenirs in the 1930s, but they have distinct markings and need to be tested for gold content and weight. While we’re at it, every auction selling jewelry and coins should purchase a gold tester precisely for this sort of thing.


One Final Booyah! to Weaver Auction for correcting identifying an authentic California gold quarter dollar, as the reverse of the lot shows. Don’t be fooled by consignors selling fake California gold. Use this post as your reference.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



Aug. 19, 2012

One Big Booyah to Key Date Coin Auction not only for providing one of the best lot descriptions, showing Eddie Caven’s prowess as a numismatist–from VAMS to incredibly sharp photos–but also for his questioning the condition of this rare Carson City coin. He identifies one of the most difficult aspects of grading: cabinet rub. We always bid with confidence at Key Date because of observations like this.


Booyah Auction Orange! for warning his bidders about these bottom-tier slabs that list every worn or cleaned coins as MS66 or MS67. Some Proxibid auctioneers even cite Red Book values for silver-melt or problem coins in hyped holders. Auction Orange doesn’t fall for it, but gains our trust because of the lot description. Nice!


Booyah yet again to Auction Orange! for noting that the coin depicted here probably is a counterfeit. With tens of thousands of counterfeit coins flooding the market from China, some really are difficult to identify. In this case, the auctioneer has spotted something that doesn’t look right. We think it might be the weight or the attempt to make the coin look circulated. In any case, we value once again how the auctioneer gains our trust.


Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting that this coin is a replica. Dave Weaver’s lot descriptions are reliable and appreciated. We caution Proxibid auctioneers to do as Dave has done here and identify these as “replicas,” NOT “tokens.” For more on California fractional gold, click here.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that cites “full bell lines” in the Proxibid title when the NGC slab doesn’t indicate such. FBL means the bottom lines of the liberty bell on the reverse of Franklin halves are visible and unbroken. The difference between a slab having and not having the designation can be substantial. If you disagree with the designation on the slab, then state why in your lot description.


Booyah Southwest Bullion! for noting what is difficult to see in the digital picture, an alteration of a coin, “tooled,” involving use of a machine to smooth a flaw–a serious possibly fraudulent infraction by some owner in this coin’s long history. Tooling has been done for decades and is difficult to detect, so the consignor probably didn’t even realize this. We’re glad Southwest Bullion did!


Booyah Topless Coins! for noting that this coated 1943 cent is magnetic, meaning it is not copper worth tens of thousands but is steel with copper plate. Nobody got rich on this coin, but we’re richer for Topless doing a magnetic test!



Sept. 9, 2012

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah to Liberty Shops Auction not only for one of the lowest buyer’s premium’s on Proxibid, 8%, but also for accurate numismatic lot descriptions so that bidders know what they are winning and can place maximums accordingly.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house and consignor. The seller misidentifies on the flip a Morgan 1898 dollar for a rare 1893. (The 8 and 3 do look alike, but on expanding of photo, the two 8s in the date match. The auctioneer copies the flip information without checking. That’s not the case with all auctioneers. Take a look at the next item.


One Big Booyah to Kaufman Auction! not only for checking the date on the Morgan dollar but also for correcting it twice–on the flip and in the lot description. These seemingly small courtesies go a long way in establishing trust.


Booyah Leonard Auction! for noting artificial color on an expensive Isabella quarter. One reason we always bid in Leonard auctions is that we know what we are trying to win. John Leonard provides excellent photos, professionally accurate numismatic lot descriptions, and is well known both in dealer and auctioneer circles. We bid with confidence here.


Booyah Midwest Coins! for noting a rim ding on a desired lot. Rim dings are often missed in scanning a coin for flaws. By identifying them as here, bidders know precisely the condition of the coin, especially if they had plans to send it in for professional grading.


Booyah Munda Auction! for noting that this key-date dime has a flat spot–typically a sign of alternation or, perhaps, damage. The dime’s surface area is small, so the auctioneer once again is providing not only a courtesy but a service to online bidders. We’d like to see more of this on Proxibid.


Boo! Boo! Boo! to this unnamed auction house for identifying a brass replica as a gold token and then not providing a reverse photo to see the bear. It states “Gold content unknown.” (That’s always a giveaway.) We grow so weary seeing auctioneers call replicas and counterfeits “tokens”–a precise numismatic term. This kind of thing led eBay to ban all replicas. Proxibid will go in that direction once bidders start charging auctioneers with violations of the Hobby Protection Act. See this article to tell how to distinguish real from fake California gold.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for trying to pass off an altered, polished coin as deep mirror worth hundreds of dollars … rather than the silver melt of this lot. Do NOT say DMPL unless you mean it and know how to identify it. Same goes for cameo. See item below.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for stating that this is a cameo. The obverse is cameo or even ultra cameo; but the reverse is neither, which means the coin isn’t cameo. The proper way to list this coin is cameo obverse.


Booyah! Legacy Auction and Realty for identifying a polished coin. Polishing is an attempt to restore luster into a coin that lacks it. It has ruined millions of coins. Auctioneers should always identify altered coins, especially polished ones that flatten devices.


Booyah SilverTowne Auction! for identifying a difficult to see scratch on a rare coin. Scratches make coins ungrade-worthy at PCGS, NGC and other top holdering companies. That’s why it’s important to note.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.


It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

One Big Booyah to SilverTowne Auction for grading a coin in a lower-tier slab more accurately for bidding. There’s a near $3000 difference between MS65 and MS62 for a 1926 $10 eagle. Watch for a post later this week about hyping coins in lower-tier slabs. SilverTowne doesn’t engage in such practices.


Booyah! to Black and Gold auction for identifying tape residue, one of the issues with this coin and difficult to remove, essentially rendering a common coin to silver melt status. But this is a rare 1895-O, and as such, the lot has value. Black and Gold Auction makes sure the buyer knows what he is getting.


One Big Booyah to Liberty Shops Auction! for going one step further and recommending that bidders view this damaged lot as silver melt. We never saw that before on Proxibid. We’re glad we did here.


Boo! to this unnamed auction house that routinely does this, inexplicably, photographing the box but not the coin. The auction house is trustworthy and the auctioneer knows numismatics, but geez, we even messaged the house to shoot the photos … to no avail.


Boo! to the same house for not showing the reverse of a 1903-S, as this coin has a rarer variety, a small “s” that can fetch hundreds of dollars in this grade. Oh, well. This suggests that someone who doesn’t know numismatics as well as the auctioneer is taking photographic shortcuts. Boo, boo, boo!


Booyah Leonard Auction! for noting that this Indian Head cent has been tampered with, probably using heat to effect a pastel rainbow. For more on this type of artificial toning, read this article.


Booyah Leonard Auction and Five Star Auction! for noting that these junk pieces are replicas, not California fractional gold. Auctioneers who do hype these brass copies as real risk violating the Hobby Protection Act. See this article to tell how to distinguish real from fake California gold.


Booyah Munda Auction! for correcting a bottom-tier holder for hyping the grade of a lot. Watch for a post from us concerning just the opposite. We’re glad Munda has the skill and integrity to call this for what it is. Kudos!


Boo! to this unnamed auction house for taking the tiniest photos we have ever seen on Proxibid and then advising bidders to view the photo for details. Bulletin: There is an online coin buying community. Learn to photograph correctly. Better still, learn numismatics.


Booyah! Weaver Coin Auction for noting that the slab is mismarked and advising bidders accordingly, yet another reason why this house consistently is at the top of our rankings.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


Jan. 22, 2013

This is the second of two Boos and Booyah posts, one of our favorite features. This post is all about the Booyahs!

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

keydate_Vam

One Big Booyah! to Key Date Coins, winner of our Best Photography Award, for capturing the finest VAM (variety) details of this 1899 Morgan. Would that other houses provided such detailed photos!


keydate_nocameo.

An Even Bigger Booyah to Key Date Coins! for not being tempted to call this Franklin half “cameo” or “deep cameo.” We see Proxibid auctioneers doing this all the time, when only one side has cameo features. Both must possess that frost. In this case, only the obverse does. Kudos to Eddie Caven for following proper numismatic descriptions! For more on cameos, click here.


booyahRollingM_whizzed

Booyah Rolling M Auction! for noting that this Morgan has been tooled, or altered, and is essentially only worth silver melt. Increasingly we see auctioneers neglecting to state this, even when the results are as obvious as this.


midwest_tooled

Booyah Midwest Coins! for noting yet another altered coin. This one has a tooled cheek, as Charles Commander notes.


dmpl_slider_star coin

Booyah Star Coin and Currency! for describing problems with what appears to be a slider rather than uncirculated DMPL. Jim Haver also points out milky spots and provides another photos for bidders to judge for themselves!


overgraded_kaufman

Booyah Kaufman Auction! for noting this bottom-tier coin is overgraded. We see so many self-slabbed and bottom-tier holders overgrading coins with auctioneers actually citing PCGS and Redbook values for silver melt Morgans. Sigh. At least Kaufman calls this correctly.


rim bump

One last Booyah to Weaver Coins and CurrencyAuction! for identifying rim bumps, which many auctioneers ignore in their descriptions and which may dramatically decrease a coin’s value. Dave Weaver is one of the top numismatic auctioneers in calling attention to a coin’s details.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


Jan. 20, 2013

This is the first of two Boos and Booyah posts, one of our favorite features. This post is all about the Boos! Next we celebrate Booyahs!

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

1threeboos

Three Big Boos to this unnamed auction house that gets the date and rarity wrong and then advises cleaning of a common Morgan dollar. It is seldom that we see three strikes in a row. This is description is OUT!


6wrongs

Boo! Boo! Boo! Boo! Boo! Boo! to this unnamed auction house that writes an overlong description to describe a brass replica. Seldom do we see six numismatic mistakes in a description. This doesn’t come from California as copper and tin are mined elsewhere; this is not from the frontier; this is not minted in 1857; this is not gold; this is not a coin; and that is supposed to be a bear on the reverse, and not a pig!


edge

Another Boo! to the same auction house for taking pains to describe a fake. One way to tell on early silver dollars is to look at the edge lettering; but no need to here. There is no 1805 Silver Dollar: Draped Bust Dollar was minted 1795-1804 and Liberty Seated Dollar, 1836-1873.


token

Boo! to this unnamed auction house that continues to describe these replicas as gold–in this case, a gold token. This is not California gold and you can’t use the word “gold” unless you test for it!


crud

Boo! to this unnamed auction house that fails to describe the crud, probably PVC residue. As such, it is not worth any money until cleaned with MS70, which removes the residue. In this case, crud of this severity typically eats the metal. You can’t tell until you remove the residue, which takes some expertise; my guess is that the metal is damaged irreparably.


noreverse

One final Boo! to this auction house which continues to make this mistake, not providing reverse photos on certain coins. You can’t do this with an 1890-CC Morgan, which might have a rare tailbar variety. Worse, the auctioneer covers the date of the coin with a sticker. Boo! Boo!


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


March 17, 2013

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

plugged

One Big Booyah! to Southwest Bullion and Coin for noting that this coin has been plugged. We see many plugged coins on Proxibid, but too few auctioneers who identify the repair. That’s not the case here!


jhaver

An Even Bigger Booyah to Jim Haver of Star Coin and Currency! Not only does Jim describe the lot accurately, he also gives a tip for bidders to recognize fake gold. We have not seen that before in our top auction houses. We’re happy to see a little numismatic education here!


overpriced

One big Boo! (or several) to this auction house that opens bids on silver melt common Kennedys at $35, about 8 times more than this 40% silver coin is worth.


PCGSvalues

Boo to this auction company! for citing PCGS values on an NGC coin. Both are top grading companies. PCGS is harsher, sells for more than NGC, and grades by different standards. NGC has its own price value page. Use that!


polished

Booyah Jewelry Exchange! for noting that this lot has been polished, drastically reducing the value. Often photographs cannot pick up polishing. We rely on auctioneers to describe it.


paige

Booyah Paige Auction! for sharp, expandable photos and nifty numismatic descriptions. We were so impressed with Paige that we dedicated a post last week to the company. Click here to read.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


May 12, 2013

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

defects

One Big Booyah! to SilverTowne’s Dave Nauert for identifying flaws in this otherwise attractive coin.


hardly

Boo! to this unnamed auction house maintaining this bagmarked slider is a super gem. If you don’t know how to grade, don’t hype.


fakegold

One Big Boo and then Booyah! (or several) to this auction house that featured a fake California gold piece and then retracted it when informed. Watch for a post on this soon.


hype

Boo! to this unnamed auction house for hyping ridiculously high this common silver lot worth $28-30 and not thousands.


investment

Boo! to this auction house that has the nerve to label what may be the ugliest flawed silver melt dollar “an investment.” The $19.95 shipping rate is about the worth of this coin.


nomintmarkmentioned

Boo! to this auction company that doesn’t know where to look for the mint mark. Bidders can rob consignors blind when this happens, and it happens too often.


onesidephoto

Boo! to this long-time Proxibid auction house that refuses to show both sides of a coin. Would you buy a car, or any item, if you saw only half of it?


polished

Booyah Traders Cottage! for noting this Peace dollar is polished. Always note flaws, and gain trust with bidders.


cleaned

Booyah Jewelry Exchange! for noting this coin has been cleaned, often hard to cipher from online photos.


varieties

Booyah Liberty Shops Auction! for taking the time to note varieties on coins, which add to value.



values_NGC

Booyah Southwest Bullion and Coin! for taking the time to note values on lots, using the right price guide for the coin in question.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.


May 29, 2013

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments and compliments best and bad auctioneer lot descriptions during the past week. We will name the best, but you will have to search Proxibid for the bad. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

bezeled

One Big Booyah! to Leonard Auction for identifying flaws in this bezeled coin (grade and details) in addition to the karat of the bezel.


doesntnotemintmark

One Big Boo! (or several) to this auction house that doesn’t know coins enough to note the mint mark on this and other lots. Bidders steal coins from consignors when this happens.


exjewelry_silvertowne

One Big Booyah! to Dave Nauert at SilverTowne who does his bidders a service by noting this gold coin was once bezeled as jewelry, significantly lowering the value of the lot. Other auctioneers typically do not state or see the jewelry mark. SilverTowne is a top company on our blog in part because of its expert grading.


munda_notes_pinhole

Booyah Munda Auction! for describing pin holes in the currency which, like bezeled coins, descreases value. We bid in Munda Auctions because of its superior grading, as described in this post.


nofsb

Boo! to this auction house that claims full split bands–a device on the reverse–without depicting the reverse. Come on, folks!


nottoned

Boo! to this auction company that doesn’t understand how improperly cleaned coins can retone. Note the dull colors. Toning should be bright and reflective on most copper coins.


nottoned_altered color

Booyah Star Coin and Currency! for noting artificial color on this lot. This is how it’s done, folks!


polished

Booyah BidALot Auction! for noting this coin has been polished, often hard to cipher from online photos.


notinvestment

Boo! to this auction company for continuing to state as “investment” horrible silver melt coins like this one, worth about $8.


weaver_cleaning

Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting when coins are cleaned. We bid with confidence in auctions by Dave and Cheryl Weaver because of their ethics and customer service!


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



July 8, 2013

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog compliments auctioneer lot descriptions. Yesterday we named the worst in recent auctions. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

cleaned

One Big Booyah to Jewelry Exchange for consistently noting cleaning on coins, difficult to detect with online photos.


dings

Another Booyah to Rolling M Auction! for noting rim dings on a coin. See this post for more information on identifying dings and bumps.


nobox

Booyah Munda Auctions! for noting on this and several other lots of proof and mint sets that the item did not contain a box. Sets without boxes sell a tad lower than with boxes. That’s why it was important to note.


excel_decatur

Booyah Decatur Coin and Jewelry! for some of the best lot descriptions on the portal. These numismatists know what they are selling and share that information with bidders.


problemcoins

Booyah Capitol Coin Auction! for consistently noting problems on coins, including multiple-item lots like this.


rimbump

Booyah SilverTowne Auctions! for consistently identifying damage, rim dings and bumps, and other issues with lots. Doing so earns repeat business from buyers who come to trust your descriptions.


rimproblems

Booyah Western Auction! for also noting rim dings, bumps and other flaws on coins.


rough edge

Booyah Gary Ryther Auctioneering! for noting issues on currency. Even if the damage is obvious, as on this coin, note it in your lot descriptions for value-added considerations!


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid.

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



Sept. 17, 2013

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments bad auctioneer lot descriptions and praises the best in recent auctions. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)

basemetal

One Big Booyah to Kaufman Coin Auction for identifying a base metal replica being passed off as a genuine 8 Reale Silver Crown.


competitors are

One Big Boo to his house for proclaiming “We Are Not In the Shipping Business!” News flash: Your competitors are. Consignors do consider these notices to bidders, and the wise auction house realizes that. In the Internet age, service comes first, and that includes shipping.


decatur description
Booyah Decatur Coins! for some of the best numismatic lot descriptions on the portal. Click photo to expand and see how much attention Decatur puts into each lot description, using it as an educational tool. That keeps bidders reading … and bidding!


leonard_details

Booyah Leonard Auction! Top house Leonard Auction not only ranks among the best numismatic graders on the portal but always includes the word “Details” if there is a flaw in the coin, helping buyers bid with confidence.


melt

Boo! to this unnamed auction house valuing a silver melt Morgan worth $22 as being worth $1000. Where is this house pulling down numbers from?


norev

Boo! to this house for noting that the reverse of the coin is toned (but we won’t show it).


polished

Booyah SilverTowne Auction! for always noting when a coin has been polished or damaged.


quality

Booyah McKee Coins! for jam-packing information into a short description, including values and condition and state of devices.



RitMar Exchange_Varieties

Booyah RitMar Exchange! for accurate numismatic descriptions, including varieties. Way to go!


succinct

Booyah Weaver Auction! for more succinct, accurate numismatic descriptions–not to mention good photos and great customer service!


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid. Tomorrow we will showcase the best lot descriptions. Stay tuned!

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.



Jan. 17

It’s important to be in sync with the Proxibid technology to showcase your photos, hone your lot descriptions, and highlight your consignments for top bids on the leading portal! In the latest installment, Proxiblog laments bad auctioneer lot descriptions and praises the best in recent auctions. (Click pictures to expand and view lot descriptions below.)


braden_ding

Booyah Braden Auction Service! for noting that this silver half dollar has obverse damage. Any detail that distracts from value should be noted, even if seemingly obvious in the photo.


sewn_repair

Booyah Weaver Auction! for noting that two halves of a torn currency were sewn together in a repair. Dave Weaver’s lot descriptions are among the best on Proxibid!


silvertowne_mark

Another Booyah to top-house SilverTowne Auction for noting damage on coins. This one is particularly helpful because it is difficult to see in the photo.


ryther_scratched

Booyah Gary Ryther Auctioneers! for noting another hard-to-see scratch on an Indian-head semi-key coin.


badphotos

Boo! to this house for awful photography. If you want to sell online, you had better master numismatic picture-taking, combining that with accurate descriptions.


not1882O

Boo! to this house for getting the description wrong. It’s not the scarce 1882-O Morgan but the common 1883-O one. When bidders see this common mistake, use the “report this item” Proxibid link so that the auctioneer can fix the mis-identification.


rim

Booyah Antiques and Estate Auctioneers! not only for acknowledging a rim problem but providing a good photo to document it.


detailed_inventory

Booyah Leonard Auction! for providing detailed description on an item that has various components, noting face value, various silver weights, denominations and more.


nokeydate

Boo! to this house for claiming the 1909 vdb is a “key date.” Key dates in the Lincoln Wheat Cent category are 1909-S vdb, 1909-S, 1914-D, 1922 plain, and 1931-S.


gold_not

Boo! to another auction house for calling the 1880-S, a very common Morgan dollar, a “key date.” Key dates for the Morgan series are 1881-CC, 1885-CC, 1889-CC, 1893-CC, 1893-S, 1895 Proof, and 1895-S.


polished
Booyah Munda Auction! for noting that this lot is polished. Often polished coins appear to be mint state when they are, in fact, rendered silver melt by polishing and alternation.


Viewers can point us to other candidates for our “Boos & Booyahs!” series. Just leave a comment but follow our rules–all in good fun as a way to inspire accurate lot descriptions on Proxibid. Tomorrow we will showcase the best lot descriptions. Stay tuned!

Proxiblog is an independent entity with no connection to the auction portal Proxibid. Our intent is to uphold basic numismatic standards as established by the American Numismatic Association and the National Auctioneer Association and to ensure a pleasurable bidding experience not only on Proxibid but also on similar portals such as iCollector and AuctionZip.

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17 thoughts on “Boos & Booyahs

  1. K & K Auctions (Krause) is doing an outstanding job with coins. As both a buyer and seller, I am impressed with how they display, describe, and auction the coins. Excellent shipping and open communications are also a big plus.

  2. What do you suggest when many coins costing many thousands of dollars are purchased from one of these auction houses only to find that they have been cleaned, some harshly and won’t grade? I’ve emailed them twice without response. This auction house is noted above as knowing what they are doing and having the knowledge and experience to have made the determination that these coins were cleaned. In each and every case these coins are given MS 60 or better ratings which obviously can’t be the case after being cleaned. It is difficult to imagine that they could not detect this…
    Dave

    • I have been purchasing coins from Proxibid auction houses for almost three years. And over that time, I have noted something that didn’t use to occur on the portal. And that is, certain companies holding regular coin auctions, sometimes several per month. You can get away with this for a time if you’re a coin dealer and an avid buyer of local collections. But if you’re an auctioneer, then you’re going to rely on dealers and consignors for more and more coins–and many of those inevitably will have problems.

      When I first started Proxiblog, I was mostly concerned about high buyers’ fees. Now I would rather pay 18%-20% and trust the auction house understands numismatics and correctly grades coins.

      I’m a very good numismatist. And in the past six months, I have lost thousands, too. One auctioneer didn’t know how to tell if a coin had been dipped. Another knew the coins were cleaned because they were returned from NGC; I made the mistake of trusting the auctioneer. No more.

      I just sent back two coins to an auction house. One was polished and the other cleaned. The auction house just cannot master photography, and again, I trusted. No more. I’ll just bid on slabbed coins from him in the future until his photos sharpen along with his numismatic skills.

      You might notice that I have been filing grading posts repeatedly and have graded auction houses on their numismatic acumen.

      The problem with the top houses to the right is that only a few have achieved consistently good ratings. Keep watch for our annual awards coming in January. The winners will be ones who can grade and who offer quality coins.

  3. I want to give a BIG BOOOOO to Liberty Coins. I purchased an item 28 days ago and have not received it yet !! I emailed the shop twice and called the shop twice. Once a left a message on a recorder, once I left a message with an assistant. And so far NO RESPONSE ! I’d rather pay $10 for shipping. This is RIDICULOUS !

    • UPDATE: After promising me they shipped my coins, Liberty failed to come up with a tracking number and has ignored all my requests for information. I have disputed all my charges with them with my credit card company today. Not the ideal way to run a company !! Be forewarned !

      • I had a very similar problem with them in December, 2012. It was a very sizable purchase. I will never, ever buy from them again.

  4. BOOOO For Liberty Shops once again. It took up until early February to resolve a December 19th Auction win. Just ehen I thought I could trust these guys, the have NOT DELIVERED since ! They Shorted me in their last shipment of bullion coins and have not resolved in over two weeks. I have complained to Proxibid and have an open dispute with them. Proxibid told me that they have “SEVERAL” other open complaints about Liberty Shops as well!! So how can THIS website give them such glowing reviews?

    • I had a very bad experience with them in November to January with a slow delivery and them lying to me about shipping. I will not even look at their auctions anymore.

      • We never had that experience. But we did have the experience with others, and we just stopped patronizing their auctions. It happens. As we always say, experiences may differ but the result is the same. If you have a bad experience, go to other auctions. We’ll be running a few posts about dispute resolutions soon.

  5. I too am going to be forced to stop dealing with Liberty. Great price, no fees and free shipping. What could be better? I have been waiting on an order for 5 weeks. On the auction it was stated that orders ship from 10-12 business days. After being promised the order would be shipped last week, I received no notice of shipment. It makes me sad because other than this issue they seem like a great company.

  6. Bad experiences on the buying and selling end with these guys. Quite frankly, they now have very poor customer service at best. They don’t deliver on time and don’t pay out on time. It’s laughable that a business would post in it’s terms that it may take 4-6 weeks to get your purchases! I won’t deal with them ever again!

    • This is an educational site. It is not a site by which you get to complain about Proxibid or their sellers. Open up your own chat board if you care to do that. We do not mention sellers by name in our Boos and Booyahs if we criticize them. And we are careful to state that our experience may differ from your own. We purchased coins, not bullion, from Liberty Shops and never had an issue with the performance of this seller. We have been inundated with mass mailings about Liberty Shops that should have gone to Proxibid. The purpose of this site is to raise scholarship money for students. That’s why we provide accurate numismatic information for free.

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